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February is American Heart Month.
American Heart Month is a federally designated event initiated to remind men and women to focus on their heart health.

National Wear Red Day - Friday, February 7, 2020
On the first Friday of every February, which is designated as American Heart Month, the nation comes together, igniting a wave of red from coast to coast. This annual event unites people for a common goal: the eradication of heart disease and stroke.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.

Heart disease-and the conditions that lead to it-can happen at any age. High rates of obesity and high blood pressure among younger people (ages 35-64) are putting them at risk for heart disease earlier in life. Half of all Americans have at least one of the top three risk factors for heart disease (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking).

Other conditions and behaviors that affect your risk for heart disease include:

Obesity. Carrying extra weight puts stress on the heart. More than 1 in 3 Americans-and nearly 1 in 6 children ages 2 to 19-has obesity.

Diabetes.
Diabetes causes sugar to build up in the blood. This can damage blood vessels and nerves that help control the heart muscle.
Nearly 1 in 10 people in the United States has diabetes.

Physical inactivity.
Staying physically active helps keep the heart and blood vessels healthy. Only 1 in 5 adults meets the physical activity guidelines of getting 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity.

Unhealthy eating patterns. Most Americans, including children, eat too much sodium (salt), which increases blood pressure. Replacing foods high in sodium with fresh fruits and vegetables can help lower blood pressure. But only 1 in 10 adults is getting enough fruits and vegetables each day. Diet high in trans-fat, saturated fat, and added sugar increases the risk factor for heart disease.

The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices.

Get your blood pressure and cholesterol checked
Don't smoke
Lose weight
Get active
Eat healthy

 

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